Announcement / Event

Event: Wednesday, December 10: “Critical Masses: The People in Policing and Warfare.” Strife and New Jersey’s Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness

strife

WHEN: Wednesday, December 10, 2014. 3:00 pm – 4:00pm

WHERE:  King’s College London, War Studies Meeting Room, K6.07

DESCRIPTION:               

The world of policing and military operations seems increasingly complex when compared to past generations.  The speed and reach of modern communications, evolving expectations of government and other entities competing for legitimacy all make it more likely that events can rapidly gain strategic significance and global reach. 

The implications of these complex environments can range from an increase of terrorism recruiting (the Abu Ghraib prison scandal), political instability (Arab Spring or the Occupy Movement) or damage to business and government institutions (the rise of political hactivism and the 2011 England riots). 

In all these cases, individuals and their communities have assumed an increasingly important role in the use and effectiveness of force.  From the British policing model founded upon “consent” of the population to the confusion over the importance of Hearts and Minds in contemporary conflicts, gaining or maintaining the popular allegiance has been a goal. 

This talk will highlight the historical place of the people in both warfare and policing, arguing that the strategic implications of whom they support and why it is critical, if not always well understood or pursued.

A 10-15 minute Q&A with the speaker as well as practitioners in the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security will follow. 

FEATURED SPEAKER:               

Jill S. Russell | Military Historian, King’s College London

Jill S. Russell is a military historian completing her Doctoral dissertation on logistics and strategic culture in the War Studies Department at King’s College London.  She holds an MPhil in Military History from George Washington University and an MA in International Relations from SAIS.  She has been a defense consultant in Washington, DC, working with both the services and the Department of Defense on matters of military policy.  She also has experience in military education, to include instruction in Strategy and Policy and research for coursework in Joint Military Operations. Her writing has appeared in professional military journals, the Telegraph, and she is a frequent contributor to the King’s College family of blogs. Her current research on the nexus of policing, warfare and the people is an outgrowth of an interest in counterinsurgency and forms one part of a larger perspective on future security issues.

MODERATOR:               

Dean Baratta | Intelligence Analyst, OHSP

Dean Baratta has over 20 years of intelligence experience within the military, law enforcement and homeland security spheres on a wide range of threats.

ABOUT OHSP:

The Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness helps to direct prevention, detection, protection, response, and recovery planning, not only at the state level, but also at the regional and national levels with our varied partners.  In addition to coordinating their efforts with other state agencies, they have a critical role in the national and regional arenas to help shape state and inter-state homeland security policy and practices.  OHSP is led by Director Chris Rodriguez and comprised of two Divisions, the Division of Intelligence and Division of Preparedness, and seven bureaus. 

ABOUT STRIFE:

Strife is a graduate student-led dual format publication, based out of the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. It comprises the present blog, as  well as a peer-reviewed academic journal, published biannually. Our thematic focus is ‘conflict’ in all shapes, forms and senses of the word. We combine political, historical, literary, and philosophical approaches to conflict (among other things) for our readers. We aim to provide thought-provoking, unique perspectives in all our work.

DISCLAIMER: Any views or opinions presented in this webinar are solely those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness (OHSP).

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